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2 edition of Family history of cancers, hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer in Canada found in the catalog.

Family history of cancers, hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer in Canada

Margarita Parthimos

Family history of cancers, hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer in Canada

by Margarita Parthimos

  • 35 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

Recent evidence of the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) revealed an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer associated with the estrogen-progestin combination pill, though a decreased risk for exposure to estrogen alone. At the time of planning of this study, there was much inconsistency in findings from observational studies, explained, in part, by the differing estrogenic potencies over time, the introduction of progestin to estrogen therapies, and the examination of different time windows of exposure between studies. The impact of HRT may also differ by the family history of cancer, though this relationship has not been thoroughly studied. The objectives of this study were to determine whether a family history of different cancers, as measured by a family history score (FHS), and ever use of HRT use were associated with the risk for postmenopausal breast cancer, and whether there was evidence of an FHS-HRT interaction.Results indicate that HRT users were not at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (OR=0.74, 95%CI: 0.52-1.05) compared to non-users. Relative to no family history of these cancers, women with a family history of cancer of the breast (OR=2.45, 95%CI: 1.37-4.36) and breast or ovary (OR=2.28, 95%CI: 1.35-3.85) were at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The FHS-HRT interaction was not statistically significant, however, analyses stratified by category of FHS (high, low, none) revealed a significant inverse effect of HRT use in women at highest risk for both a family history of cancer of the breast (OR=0.27, 95%CI: 0.10-0.71), and breast or ovary (OR=0.22, 95%CI: 0.09-0.53). These significant inverse associations are suggestive of a beneficial effect of HRT for women at highest risk based on their family history, and suggest estrogen as a viable alternative to prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy, as approximately 85% of HRT users reported exposure to estrogen alone. This requires further study.A case-control study nested within the Canadian National Breast Screening Study was conducted, with controls selected via incidence-density sampling at a case:control ratio of 4:1. Study participants (n=1,255) were stratified by menopausal status with only postmenopausal women (n=671 cases, 216 controls) included in the HRT and FHS-HRT interaction analyses.

Edition Notes

Statementby Margarita Parthimos.
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 146 leaves.
Number of Pages146
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19758319M
ISBN 109780494159125

  Effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Breast Cancer Risk: Estrogen Versus Estrogen Plus Progestin benign breast disease history, family history of breast cancer, use of mammographic screening, history of smoking, alcohol and caffeine consumption, and a detailed history of use of HRT and oral contraceptives. Problems involved in Cited by: T1 - The role of hormone replacement therapy in the risk for breast cancer and total mortality in women with a family history of breast cancer. AU - Sellers, Thomas A. AU - Mink, Pamela J. AU - Cerhan, James R. AU - Zheng, Wei. AU - Anderson, Kristin E. AU - Kushi, Lawrence H. AU - Folsom, Aaron R. PY - /12/1. Y1 - /12/1Cited by:

  Further evidence of a link between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer is the rebound in cancer incidence rates observed in Canada since The largest hormone replacement therapy declines occurred among those older than 50 years (Figure 2), and the rebound in cancer incidence was also mainly restricted to women aged 50 years or Cited by:   Family history of breast cancer. A woman’s risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, sister, or daughter (first-degree relative) or multiple family members on either her mother’s or father’s side of the family who have had breast cancer. Having a first-degree male relative with breast cancer also raises a woman’s risk.

Take hormone replacement therapy prescribed by a doctor Have a family history of breast cancer or genetic changes known to cause breast cancer; Women in this age group who have none of these factors will have a mammogram every 2 years, for a total of three mammograms over 5 years. For women with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer treated with surgery, tamoxifen can help lower the chances of the cancer coming back and raise the chances of living longer. It can also lower the risk of getting a new cancer in the other breast. Tamoxifen can be started either after surgery (adjuvant therapy) or before surgery.


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Family history of cancers, hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer in Canada by Margarita Parthimos Download PDF EPUB FB2

CONCLUSION: Family history and estrogen plus progesterone replacement therapy have independent and noninteracting effects on the risk of invasive breast cancer among participants in the Women's Health Initiative randomized by: Since family history is immutable and taking hormones is a personal choice having potential clinical benefits, the absolute risks associated with choosing hormone therapy can help women decide whether the incremental breast cancer risk is by: There is strong evidence that using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) raises a woman’s risk of breast, ovarian and uterine cancers.

At the same time, it may lower the risk of colorectal cancer. HRT and breast cancer. Combined HRT for menopause is a known cause of breast cancer, mainly in women who recently used or are still using the therapy.

Research shows that taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for a long time increases the risk of breast cancer. This is especially true for HRT that uses estrogen plus progestin.

Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT)—also called postmenopausal hormone therapy and hormone replacement therapy—is a treatment that doctors may recommend to relieve common symptoms of menopause and to address long-term biological changes, such as bone loss, that result from declining levels of the natural hormones estrogen and progesterone in a woman’s body during and after.

For decades, women have used hormone therapy to ease symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes and sweating. This is called menopausal hormone therapy, and you may see it abbreviated as HT or MHT. You may also hear it described as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), postmenopausal hormone therapy (PHT), or postmenopausal hormones (PMH).

Current or recent past users of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) have a higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Before the link between HRT use and breast cancer risk was established, many postmenopausal women took HRT for many years to ease menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, fatigue) and to reduce bone loss.

• Yes, evidence shows that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can increase risk of breast, ovarian and endometrial (womb) cancers • But it’s important to remember that the increased risk is small • For some, the benefits of taking HRT may outweigh the risks, so talk to your GP about the options.

In some cases, a strong family history of breast cancer is linked to having an abnormal gene associated with a high risk of breast cancer, such as the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.

In other cases, an abnormal CHEK2 gene may play a role in developing breast cancer. Cervical cancer: Women who have used oral contraceptives for 5 or more years have a higher risk of cervical cancer than women who have never used oral contraceptives.

The longer a woman uses oral contraceptives, the greater the increase in her risk of cervical cancer. One study found a 10% increased risk for less than 5 years of use, a 60%.

Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer Article Literature Review in Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 8(11) August with 48 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

This means that the cancer cells have receptors for estrogen (ER+), progesterone (PR+) or both. When cancer cells have these receptors, the hormones can attach to them and help them grow.

Research has shown that giving hormonal therapy after surgery and radiation therapy lowers the risk that the breast cancer will come back, and improves survival.

Background. Breast cancer is a prevalent malignant disease in the world and the leading cause of death in women [1, 2].Plentiful risk factors have been identified, including anthropometric factors, reproductive factors, home environment, and genetic factors [3–5].Family history of breast cancer is a key breast cancer risk by: 3.

We found no association between breast cancer risk and extended duration (20 years or more) of use of oestrogen replacement therapy.’ In a year prospective and follow-up study [24], there were six cases of breast cancer in 52 never-users of HRT, whereas none of the women who had used ERT at any time developed breast cancer (p = ).

Although associated with a decreased risk of developing osteoporosis (thinning bones), studies suggest certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may increase breast cancer risk and that risk increases with increasing duration of use.

HRT is used to relieve symptoms of. Introduction. A significant elevation in breast cancer risk among users of menopausal estrogen plus progestin therapy (EPT) has been observed across multiple studies (), including the recently conducted Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial (2, 3).When results from this trial were announced inclinical guidelines were re-formulated to recommend that women use hormones at low Cited by: Abstract.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the most efficacious intervention for the treatment of estrogen-deficiency symptoms.

Prescriptions for HRT have fallen over the last 3 years due to anxiety provoked about breast cancer risk and recurrence that has been generated by recent clinical trials.

Sellers TA, Mind PJ, Cerhan JR, et al. The role of hormone replacment therapy in the risk for breast cancer and total mortality in women with a family history of breast cancer Cited by: 9.

Oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and cancer: Part II in the thoroughly modern assault on women and girls In an article published in the AFA Journal, November, I outlined how the huge increase in the level of estrogen in the first trimester of pregnancy is the explanation for the link that 29 out of 38 studies world wide.

Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. Breast cancer and hormone replacement therapy: collaborative reanalysis of data from 51 epidemiological studies of 52, women with breast cancer andwomen without breast cancer.

Lancet. ;()PubMed Google Scholar CrossrefCited by:. For instance, taking combined menopausal hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin, which is a synthetic version of the female hormone progesterone) can increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer. Menopausal hormone therapy with estrogen alone increases the risk of endometrial cancer and is used only in women who have had a hysterectomy.Family history of certain cancers.

Women who have a family history of breast cancer have a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. A family history of colorectal, uterine or pancreatic cancer may also increase the risk for ovarian cancer.

Personal history of breast cancer. Women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer have a higher risk of. The role of hormone replacement therapy in the risk for breast cancer and total mortality in women with a family history of breast s TA, Mink PJ, Cerhan JR, Zheng W, Anderson KE, Kushi LH, Folsom on of Epidemiology, University of .